2
Mar2020

PRIM&R endorses the OSTP efforts to improve the consistency of guidelines for best practices in long-term storage of data from federally funded research. We especially appreciate the current step of developing a proposed, common set of desirable characteristics of data repositories, because this kind of forward thinking has the potential to improves standards for both government and non-governmental data repositories alike. Read more

24
Feb2020

Just by reading this title you probably have guessed that I am a big Star Wars Fan. We are a special breed, one that grew up with the movies and who like to complain about changes to the original saga. I will save you from my opinion on whether Han truly shot first or not, but as the last movie of the Star Wars franchise was released, I cannot help but notice some parallels between the journey of a Jedi and the work of an IRB professional working with single IRB studies.

A Jedi in these movies is a reluctant student, one forced to learn the ways of the Force due to the [...] Read more

18
Feb2020

This edition of Research Ethics Roundup covers “unkind science” and the public’s waning trust, international efforts to develop data sharing standards, lack of diversity in psychological research subjects, and digital phenotyping.  Read more

6
Feb2020

This January, PRIM&R welcomed three new members to our Board of Directors. All three of these members exemplify service to the field of research ethics and promise to be strong stewards of PRIM&R’s mission in the years to come. These new members are as follows: Holly Fernandez Lynch, JD, MBE; Megan Kasimatis Singleton, JD, MBE, CIP; and Gianna “Gigi” McMillan, MA, D. Bioethics. Read more

4
Feb2020

Women are two-thirds of the world’s blind population, and there is no clear evidence for the cause of this alarming statistic. Dr. Janine Austin Clayton’s keynote address, "It’s About Quality Construction—Advancing a Foundational Framework for Rigorous Research Relevant to the Health of Women," at AER19 began with this disturbing fact as she described her path from being an ophthalmologist to the Director for NIH’s Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH). As she discussed this, and other startling statistics regarding women’s health in the United States, it caused me to wonder why gender and sex are not routinely considered in study design. How are studies ensuring that women (and sex as a biological variable) are integrated into the design of animal and human research studies so that knowledge and treatments gained from these studies can be generalizable and effective for both men and women? Read more