8
Aug2022

We are finally witnessing increasing adoption of digital pathology in clinical practice. Pathologists are beginning to embrace and utilize artificial intelligence (AI) tools and ideas to augment routine pathology practice. All stakeholders in pathology need to fully understand the ethical frameworks required to develop, deploy, and maintain transparent, trustworthy, explainable, scalable, interoperable, and sustainable digital AI tools. Read more

5
Aug2022

Are you excited about PRIMR22? Interested in sharing your thoughts on the conference with the rest of PRIM&R’s audience? If so, consider applying for the PRIMR22 Blog Squad! Whether you work with IRBs, IACUCs, conflict of interest programs, or any other aspect of the research ethics and oversight field, there’s a place for you. Read more

2
Aug2022

In the years when I worked as an IRB reviewer, I would often identify far too complex participant-facing materials, but I wouldn't know where to start to simplify or clarify the content. I've since had the opportunity to focus on health literacy and how health literacy best practices can fundamentally change the way science and research are communicated to patients, participants, and their caregivers. Read more

28
Jul2022

Hopefully the pandemic is not here to stay, but even when it's gone, I suspect work from home for research administrators will stay in one form or another for many people. Because in the end, it's not just the HRPPs going virtual: the entire research administrative enterprise is in this virtual world with them. Read more

27
Jul2022

This month’s Research Ethics Roundup covers the reportage of the PHS Study of Untreated Syphilis, considering the ethics of research on insects, multiple perspectives on patient engagement in clinical trials, and the challenges of developing drugs for ultrarare diseases. Read more

22
Jul2022

We urge funders, study sponsors, researchers, ethicists, research leaders, accountants, and other stakeholders involved in decision-making regarding payments to Community Advisory Board (CAB) members to view CAB members as experiential experts whose time is valuable and whose contributions to science have long been undervalued. Valuing and paying CAB members can help operationalize trustworthiness, ethics, justice, equity, and fairness in the research process. The notion of CAB member involvement needs to be urgently reconsidered if we aim to work for full and representative inclusion and critical equity. Read more