TAG ARCHIVES FOR Blog Squad

12
Aug2019

Attending the 2018 Advancing Ethical Research (AER) Conference was a fantastic opportunity to connect with colleagues, hear renowned speakers address regulatory hot topics, and share ideas and best practices. Science and technology are expanding exponentially; as a result, our research community is becoming increasingly diverse and multi-center research is booming. While historically the regulations have remained relatively unchanged, in recent years the regulatory community has worked together to provide feedback on suggested major updates and new guidance which are greatly shifting the regulatory world. This year's AER Conference takes place November 18-20, 2019 in Boston, MA Read more

16
Jul2019

Why are people taken in by pseudoscience and the accompanying “scientific” jargon that gives a false impression claims are backed by laboratory research and facts? Why have scientists like me gone from being viewed as god-like, having put mankind on the moon, to nimrods who’re in the pocket of big pharma? And most of all, how is it that I had not heard of Timothy Caulfield before the 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER18)? Read more

9
Jul2019

PRIM&R’s 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER18) was very inspiring. It provided me an opportunity to be immersed in an interesting learning opportunity, wherein I noted a common theme of this conference was to highlight the changes in the revised Common Rule and its practical implementation. Read more

25
Jun2019

Since the National Archives in Washington were founded they have solved historical mysteries, provided key information, and unlocked a great deal of forgotten knowledge. The power of records and record keeping is influential at all levels of human existence, but also may be harmful to the least empowered individuals in society (such as refugees or the elderly). At PRIM&R's AER Conference, presenters offered insights into essential documentation and stressed the importance of good record keeping and data management for IRBs. Read more

19
Jun2019

There’s a growing trend in Social, Behavioral, and Education Research (SBER)–machine learning–in which investigators often request to obtain, through direct interaction and intervention, various sets of data on human subjects, including their physiological (i.e., data obtained from either invasive or non-invasive means) and/or biometric data (e.g., audio/visual recordings). The research as originally conceived may or may not have been considered human subjects research, but its ultimate purpose is to teach machines how to think, draw conclusions, and process information in much the same way humans do. Read more