TAG ARCHIVES FOR Blog Squad

19
Jun2019

There’s a growing trend in Social, Behavioral, and Education Research (SBER)–machine learning–in which investigators often request to obtain, through direct interaction and intervention, various sets of data on human subjects, including their physiological (i.e., data obtained from either invasive or non-invasive means) and/or biometric data (e.g., audio/visual recordings). The research as originally conceived may or may not have been considered human subjects research, but its ultimate purpose is to teach machines how to think, draw conclusions, and process information in much the same way humans do. Read more

10
Jun2019

During the 2019 IACUC Conference, I attended a discussion on engaging the public in conversations about the use of animals in research. In reflecting on this session, I felt both worry and hope. My gut tells me that when regulatory agencies ask for input on items of importance to research, an overwhelming number of responses are from detractors of animal research in support of their personal agenda, while those of us in the research world remain silent, maybe finding comfort in the thought that “someone else will reply”. We have to start speaking openly and honestly about what we do.We have to be strong advocates and build  bridges for communicating with the public so that a new generation continues to carry the torch in support of responsible animal research into the future. Read more

4
Jun2019

Those in the field of laboratory animal medicine come to this job with love for animals, but a special kind of love—one that understands that we will be separated, but agrees to love anyway. We give these research animals the best we can give; so they play and are healthy and can serve science and society. Because we understand that a rescued pet is a healthy old dog today thanks to the vaccines and heartworm medication developed using lab animals. We understand that my mother-in-law is healthy today thanks to the surgery, chemo, and radiation developed using lab animals. And we dream that someday, hopefully sooner than later, cancer and diabetes and heart disease will all be diseases of the past, thanks to lab animals. Read more

28
May2019

Among the speakers at IACUC19, one in particular, Leland S. Shapiro, PhD, touched me in a unique way. A brain tumor survivor and fellow martial artist (I have a brown belt in Tae Kwon Do), Dr. Shapiro related his story in an unusually funny and endearing fashion. He shared his full experience, from his initial symptoms, to his struggle to find a doctor. His frustration and moments of almost giving up, his perseverance and fight—his ultimate triumph. As he explained, he is a living legacy of animal-based research. And I think this is something we can all relate to and find similar stories of in our own circles: family members, friends, neighbors saved by medical interventions made possible by animal research. Read more

24
May2019

Approximately 80% of the US population has a social media account. Social media can be a powerful research tool for recruiting subjects and for conducting research. As regulatory professionals tasked with protecting research subjects, it’s important to understand the unique risks and benefits of social media use for research.Luckily, at PRIM&R’s 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference, there was a session devoted solely to the complex issues related to research on social media. Read more