TAG ARCHIVES FOR animal research

10
Sep2019

On June 20, PRIM&R hosted a webinar, Advanced Noncompliance Scenarios for IACUCs: Laboratory Animals and Wildlife, which presented interactive scenarios to assist IACUCs in navigating the challenges associated with identifying, investigating, reporting, and correcting noncompliance at their institution. In this blog post, Stacy Pritt, DVM, MS, MBA, CPIA, CHRC, DACAW, assistant vice president for conflict of interest and the IACUC at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, offers input on a protocol review process called veterinary verification and consultation (VVC), and explores a scenario from the webinar in which this method may be employed by the IACUC to prevent noncompliance as well as to reduce regulatory burden. Read more

11
Jul2019

Every day and with every interaction, animals learn how to respond to the people in their research environment. Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques can improve animals’ level of compliance with research tasks, as well as their physiological response to their environment. It’s critical that IACUC members have a working knowledge of classical and operant conditioning in order to critically assess whether research proposals include appropriate PRT. On April 17, PRIM&R hosted a webinar to instruct IACUC professionals and members about PRT. Kelly Morrisroe, a research scientist and primate trainer at the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) at the University of Washington, served as the speaker. After the webinar, the presenter responded to some of the attendee questions that time didn’t permit us to address live. We’re pleased to share those responses with the readers of Ampersand. Read more

10
Jun2019

During the 2019 IACUC Conference, I attended a discussion on engaging the public in conversations about the use of animals in research. In reflecting on this session, I felt both worry and hope. My gut tells me that when regulatory agencies ask for input on items of importance to research, an overwhelming number of responses are from detractors of animal research in support of their personal agenda, while those of us in the research world remain silent, maybe finding comfort in the thought that “someone else will reply”. We have to start speaking openly and honestly about what we do.We have to be strong advocates and build  bridges for communicating with the public so that a new generation continues to carry the torch in support of responsible animal research into the future. Read more

4
Jun2019

Those in the field of laboratory animal medicine come to this job with love for animals, but a special kind of love—one that understands that we will be separated, but agrees to love anyway. We give these research animals the best we can give; so they play and are healthy and can serve science and society. Because we understand that a rescued pet is a healthy old dog today thanks to the vaccines and heartworm medication developed using lab animals. We understand that my mother-in-law is healthy today thanks to the surgery, chemo, and radiation developed using lab animals. And we dream that someday, hopefully sooner than later, cancer and diabetes and heart disease will all be diseases of the past, thanks to lab animals. Read more

28
May2019

Among the speakers at IACUC19, one in particular, Leland S. Shapiro, PhD, touched me in a unique way. A brain tumor survivor and fellow martial artist (I have a brown belt in Tae Kwon Do), Dr. Shapiro related his story in an unusually funny and endearing fashion. He shared his full experience, from his initial symptoms, to his struggle to find a doctor. His frustration and moments of almost giving up, his perseverance and fight—his ultimate triumph. As he explained, he is a living legacy of animal-based research. And I think this is something we can all relate to and find similar stories of in our own circles: family members, friends, neighbors saved by medical interventions made possible by animal research. Read more