28
May2020

Researchers in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Will Schupmann, BA, and David Wendler, PhD, invite IRB members to participate in a short study related to pediatric research ethics. The purpose of the study is to explore and compare the views of members of the general public and the views of members of IRBs on various types of medical research with children. The information collected is intended to help inform how IRBs evaluate the ethical acceptability of proposed medical research in the future. The study's three main research questions are:

  1. Do members of the general public and members of IRBs consider the potential benefits of Phase I pediatric oncology studies to outweigh their risks?
  2. Do members of the general public and members of IRBs consider it appropriate to enroll children in net risk research for reasons other than the potential for medical benefit?
  3. Do members of the general public and members of IRBs consider it appropriate to expose children to greater net risks in studies with greater levels of social value?

There are five short parts to the survey, some of which require participants to read a hypothetical medical scenario and answer questions based on it. The survey will take participants approximately 15 minutes to complete.

To participate in the study, please click here, or paste the following URL into your web browser: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QCMNDW3

For questions or additional information, please contact Will Schupmann at will.schupmann@nih.gov.

This study is funded by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH.

Will_Schupmann-01Will Schupmann, BA, is a fellow in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health, where he conducts conceptual and empirical research on ethical questions that arise in pediatric research and genetic testing.

 

David_Wendler-01David Wendler, PhD, is a senior investigator and Head of the Section on Research Ethics in the same department. His current research focuses on clinical trials and clinical care with individuals who are unable to give informed consent.

 

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