TAG ARCHIVES FOR webinar

11
Jul2019

Every day and with every interaction, animals learn how to respond to the people in their research environment. Positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques can improve animals’ level of compliance with research tasks, as well as their physiological response to their environment. It’s critical that IACUC members have a working knowledge of classical and operant conditioning in order to critically assess whether research proposals include appropriate PRT. On April 17, PRIM&R hosted a webinar to instruct IACUC professionals and members about PRT. Kelly Morrisroe, a research scientist and primate trainer at the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) at the University of Washington, served as the speaker. After the webinar, the presenter responded to some of the attendee questions that time didn’t permit us to address live. We’re pleased to share those responses with the readers of Ampersand. Read more

19
Jun2019

There’s a growing trend in Social, Behavioral, and Education Research (SBER)–machine learning–in which investigators often request to obtain, through direct interaction and intervention, various sets of data on human subjects, including their physiological (i.e., data obtained from either invasive or non-invasive means) and/or biometric data (e.g., audio/visual recordings). The research as originally conceived may or may not have been considered human subjects research, but its ultimate purpose is to teach machines how to think, draw conclusions, and process information in much the same way humans do. Read more

8
Apr2019

As genomics and personalized medicine advance, there is increased awareness that “race” is an inappropriate proxy for groups that may share a genetic background. However, proposals that assume that self-reported race correlates with biological/genetic difference are still being submitted and approved at institutions across the country—even as genetic evidence reveals that the difference between races is smaller than differences among individuals of any particular race. Such studies risk perpetuating racist stereotypes, inappropriately influencing clinical medicine, and reinforcing inaccurate ideas about biology and race. It’s important that research oversight professionals understand how to approach the continued wave of race-based research. On February 21, PRIM&R hosted a webinar to provide guidance for IRBs in this area. After the webinar, presenters responded to some of the attendee questions that time didn’t permit us to address live; we’re pleased to share those responses with the readers of Ampersand. Read more

22
Jan2019

Postapproval monitoring (PAM) ensures that research is being carried out in the manner that was originally approved by the IACUC and many institutions employ PAM as a self-auditing mechanism to check on compliance. A well-run PAM program can also lead to improved animal welfare, science, and collaboration among departments in the animal care and use program. Having a robust framework for conducting PAM promotes education, transparency, and communication between researchers and the institution. Read more

17
Dec2018

The question of whether and how to return individual research results to subjects has been an ongoing area of uncertainty for investigators and research institutions. The recent report from the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), Return of Individual-Specific Research Results to Participants: Guidance for a New Research Paradigm, offered recommendations for “a process-oriented approach to returning individual research results that considers the value to the research subject, the risks and feasibility of return, and the quality of the research laboratory.” On October 3, 2018, PRIM&R hosted a webinar to summarize the recommendations of the report, and provide guidance specifically on its potential implications for IRBs. Read more