TAG ARCHIVES FOR vulnerable populations

18
Jan2017

Just before entering the Arena to participate in Panel VI: Re-Framing Informed Consent: Respecting Participants When Barriers to Regulatory Consent Exist moderated by Christine Grady, RN, PhD, and panelists Michelle H. Biros, MD; Neal Dickert Jr., MD, PhD; and Robert Silbergleit, MD, I recalled the three questions that I formulated upon registering for the AER16 conference. Read more

6
Jan2017

Much of my AER16 schedule focused on risks in vulnerable populations. For me, an important backdrop for these topics was presented in the Plenary Session A New Framework for Human Subjects Research? An Update from NAS, moderated by Alexander Capron. The presenters, Barbara Bierer, MD, Steven Joffe, MD, MPH, and Heather Pierce, JD, MPH, did not discuss research risks or vulnerable populations, but they discussed how the current regulatory and policy framework fits with current research practices. Read more

3
Jan2017

As part of my AER16 conference participation, I attended Panel III: Research With Children and Adolescents: Who and How is the Decisions Made to Participate? moderated by Susan Z. Kornetsky. The presentation examined the tension among the heightened protections of children, specifically adolescent participants, under Subpart D of 45 CFR 46, the need for research with these populations, and the desire for participant autonomy. Read more

13
Dec2016

In the AER16 session B20: Research with Children: Regulations and Beyond with presenters Francis J. DiMario, MD, MA, CIP, Jaime O. Hernandez, JD, M.Be., and Robert M. Nelson, MD, PhD, I came to understand—for possibly the first time in my career—the federal regulations as accommodating. Don’t get me wrong, Subpart B, C, and D of 45 CFR 46 scrupulously outline the additional protections IRBs must consider when conducting research with vulnerable populations. However, I now realize that the regulations were written with intentional flexibility. Read more

28
Aug2015

On July 10, 2015, the US House of Representatives passed H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act, with a vote of 344-77. The passage of the bill, which many have hailed as a noteworthy example of bipartisan collaboration, is the result of more than a year of congressional hearings, roundtable discussions, whitepapers, and political debate. First introduced in April 2014 by Fred Upton (R-MI), chairman of the US House of Representatives’ Energy and Commerce Committee, and Representative Diana DeGette (D-CO), the 21st Century Cures initiative seeks to "accelerate the pace of cures in America."

The legislative phase of the 21st [...] Read more