TAG ARCHIVES FOR transparency

6
Aug2018

In April, the EPA published a proposed rule titled, Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science. The rule would prohibit the EPA from basing regulatory action on scientific studies for which the underlying raw data and models are not publicly available “in a manner sufficient for validation and analysis.” The due date for comments on this rule is August 16. As a nonpartisan organization dedicated to advancing the highest ethical standards in the conduct of research that advances human health and well-being, PRIM&R decided it was important to comment on this proposed rule, detailing two main concerns. First, we believe that the proposed rule arbitrarily restricts access to and use of rigorous, peer-reviewed science in environmental policymaking, to the detriment of the public’s health and trust in the regulatory process. Second, we argue that the proposed rule fails to respect the contributions of human research participants. We urge EPA to withdraw this misguided rule immediately. Read more

5
May2017

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup reviews the ways research with biospecimens has changed since Henrietta Lacks' story made news, how the National Institutes of Health (NIH)'s grant application changes focus on transparency in preclinical research, how ethicists can avoid stereotyping prisoners who choose to participate in research, and how one of the top research search engines is improving transparency efforts. Read more

24
Feb2017

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup highlights the argument for treating medical data donations like organ donations, bioethicists’ suggestions for how to lower drug costs, how Australian animal researchers are using unpiloted drones, and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s decision to re-publish a portion of the Animal Welfare Act records that they previously removed. Read more

11
Nov2016

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup examines the new online transparency tool from AllTrials, returning data to participants in genetic research, concerns about overuse of genetically modified animals, and the potential for placebos as treatments for non-urgent pain. Read more