TAG ARCHIVES FOR SACHRP

3
Sep2019

Some of the most significant changes in the revised Common Rule involve the provisions around informed consent, including the new requirement that informed consent begin with a “concise and focused presentation of key information that is most likely to assist a prospective subject or legally authorized representative in understanding the reasons why one might or might not want to participate in the research” [46.116(a)(5)(i)]—the “key information requirement,” for short. I welcome the key information requirement and think it has the potential to greatly improve informed consent, but it is bringing with it several complexities. Read more

5
Feb2019

PRIM&R recently submitted comments in response to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s proposed rule "Institutional Review Board Waiver or Alteration of Informed Consent for Minimal Risk Clinical Investigations," which was published in the Federal Register on November 15, 2018. Comments are due February 13. Read more

15
May2018

On April 19, HHS and 16 other federal agencies released a new Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would delay the general compliance date for the revised Common Rule an addition six months, to January 21, 2019. The NPRM also proposes to allow institutions to implement three “burden-reducing provisions” during the delay period. Comments on the NPRM are due May 21, and as you consider developing and submitting your comments, I wanted to share the letter PRIM&R has submitted. Read more

13
Jun2017

Over the coming months, I’m going to look more closely at a few areas of the revised rule. I won’t be giving tips on implementation, just pointing out some of what I find interesting in a few specific areas. In this post, I’m going to take a deeper dive into the changes around informed consent, an area that, as I mentioned in my preliminary reflections on the rule, I am pretty excited about. Read more

4
Jun2015

By Avery Avrakotos, education and policy manager

In March, the Newborn Screening Saves Live Reauthorization Act of 2014 went into effect. The act, which is an extension of the Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act of 2008, reauthorizes nearly $20 million in funding and expands state-based infant screening programs. It also contains a controversial amendment that requires informed consent for any federally funded research activities using newborn dried bloodspots.
Infant screening programs have been in place in the United States for more than 50 years. The programs, which are Read more