TAG ARCHIVES FOR research participants

11
Jun2020

When I started my research career back in 2004, I was working in the biggest trauma center in the Atlanta area, Grady Healthcare System. I had arrived in the country under a work visa to help with the Department of Orthopaedics' clinical trials. I remember the nervousness of speaking to potential study participants because I was not only new to clinical research, having only done chart review projects in the past, I was also new in America and America’s history of research with minorities. Now, after all these years working as a research coordinator and IRB professional, and living in the United States for more than 15 years, I know how important it is to rebuild trust and increase minority participation in research to ensure not only that we are doing quality studies, but also that we help in diminishing the social injustices our communities still undergo today. Read more

3
Sep2019

Some of the most significant changes in the revised Common Rule involve the provisions around informed consent, including the new requirement that informed consent begin with a “concise and focused presentation of key information that is most likely to assist a prospective subject or legally authorized representative in understanding the reasons why one might or might not want to participate in the research” [46.116(a)(5)(i)]—the “key information requirement,” for short. I welcome the key information requirement and think it has the potential to greatly improve informed consent, but it is bringing with it several complexities. Read more

22
Feb2019

It’s been suggested by some that it is time to jettison the term “research subject” from our research ethics vocabulary—including in the regulations—and  exclusively use the term “research participant” to refer to those who enroll in research. While there are many compelling arguments for using "participant" instead of "subject" in the modern research context, PRIM&R's executive director, Elisa A. Hurley, PhD, argues that we need to keep both research "subject and research "participant" in our shared vocabulary. Read more

25
May2017

In early 2014, PRIM&R explored the topic of what we call individuals who volunteer for research in a post titled "What’s in a name? Research 'participant' versus research 'subject'." In this post, PRIM&R concludes that, on the whole, "subject" is the most appropriate title for those involved in research studies (recognizing, however, that in some instances "participant " may be appropriate; for example, in community-based participatory and participant-led research). Herein we present the contrasting points of view of three individuals. Read more