TAG ARCHIVES FOR research ethics

23
Aug2018

Welcome to Research Ethics Reading List, a new feature from Ampersand where we feature books in or adjacent to the field of research ethics that we think you’ll find interesting, motivating, inspiring,  challenging, or some combination of the four! In this edition we look at books about tech industry bias and blind spots; the powers, perversions, and potential of heredity; animal Infections and the next human pandemic; and more! Read more

6
Aug2018

In April, the EPA published a proposed rule titled, Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science. The rule would prohibit the EPA from basing regulatory action on scientific studies for which the underlying raw data and models are not publicly available “in a manner sufficient for validation and analysis.” The due date for comments on this rule is August 16. As a nonpartisan organization dedicated to advancing the highest ethical standards in the conduct of research that advances human health and well-being, PRIM&R decided it was important to comment on this proposed rule, detailing two main concerns. First, we believe that the proposed rule arbitrarily restricts access to and use of rigorous, peer-reviewed science in environmental policymaking, to the detriment of the public’s health and trust in the regulatory process. Second, we argue that the proposed rule fails to respect the contributions of human research participants. We urge EPA to withdraw this misguided rule immediately. Read more

16
Mar2018

You are the chairperson of an IRB overseeing a study comparing three diabetes drugs. Some of the study participants have been talking about the study on social media. The investigator believes their posts have affected study enrollment, adherence and retention. How should the investigator deal with study participants who are sharing their study experiences online? Read more

8
Jan2018

You are a member of the board at Florida Central IRB. You are reviewing a vaccine study for Zika2, a deadly infectious disease that has recently emerged in Florida and is spreading fast. The only clinical study discussed in the Investigator’s Brochure was conducted in Brazil, where Zika2 originated. It provides scientifically sound evidence that supports the proposed study. However, you have just learned that, because of the emergency situation in Brazil, the investigators made the decision to conduct their study without regulatory or ethics committee approval, in a vulnerable population, and without informed consent. The Brazilian manufacturer and investigators will not be involved in the proposed study. Time is of the essence. Will you vote to approve the study? Read more

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