TAG ARCHIVES FOR research ethics roundup

4
Mar2016

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup examines the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) decision to host a workshop on using monkeys in research, a new BMJ study on academic institutions that are not reporting to ClinicalTrials.gov, and two editorials on government initiatives in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Safety First: In this editorial, Nature states their concern that some federal departments have still not complied with a Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues’ request that basic data about departmental work with human subjects be publicly available. Nature [...] Read more

19
Feb2016

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup explores how a disastrous French clinical trial is leading to calls for improved data sharing, new National Institutes of Health (NIH) requirements for biomedical research, and the NIH’s prediction on when a Zika vaccine may go to trial are also highlighted. (more…)

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8
Jan2016

From a study on the lack of racial diversity in clinical research to appeals for improved clinical trial reporting, this week’s Research Ethics Roundup looks at new policy concerns for the research community.

Social Media1. Why Social Media Needs to Have a Code of Ethics for Clinical Research: In this opinion piece for CIO Magazine, Eric Swirsky argues that the clinical research community needs to develop detailed research guidelines for research done with social media data. He points out that social media users may not fully [...] Read more

4
Dec2015

From major developments in the animal research field to the new proposed changes to the Common Rule, this week’s Research Ethics Roundup examines new ethical concerns in a changing research landscape.

daydreaming-chimpanzee-1553285-638x477NIH to Retire All Research Chimpanzees: NIH will send their research chimpanzees to sanctuaries and will begin to phase out their support for research on chimpanzees that they do not own. NIH’s director, Francis Collins, said NIH decided to end their chimpanzee research program because the need for research on chimpanzees had declined [...] Read more