TAG ARCHIVES FOR news

25
Aug2012

India plans to reform oversight of medical research, while Harvard University agrees to restructure  their Primate Center. Learn about these changes and more in this week’s Research Ethics Roundup!

Testing what we think we know: This opinion piece from The New York Times posits that researchers ought to spend less time investigating novel technologies, and more time evaluating whether standard treatments are actually effective and efficient.

10
Aug2012

In this week’s Research Ethics Roundup, hear the latest developments in the H5N1 debate, explore one doctor’s plan to minimize research misconduct, and learn about a recent study that found that some physicians may be doing research for all the wrong reasons.

Private-sector physicians run clinical trials mostly for the money, study finds: There has been a dramatic shift in those conducting most clinical trials from academically-affiliated physicians to private-sector physicians. A new study suggests this shift might be the result of big money’s influence over medical research, with many doctors thinking of trials as business ventures rather than scientific endeavors. <[...] Read more

27
Jul2012

Recent changes to clinical trial rules in Europe, an emerging controversy over Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anemia drugs, and heated debate over the bird flu moratorium are all in the mix in this week’s Research Ethics Roundup.

Europe proposes revision of clinical trial rules: The European Commission has formally adopted proposals for new rules to replace the controversial Clinical Trials Directive. Experts predict that these changes will reduce some of the red tape that has resulted in bloated insurance costs and a reduction in the number of clinical trials being conducted in the EU since the inception of the directive.

25
Jul2012

by Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH, Executive Director

Last week’s Food and Drug Administration approval of Truvada, the first drug to help prevent HIV infection in high-risk populations, was extraordinary, and extraordinarily well-timed. The announcement coincided with the opening of the 2012 International AIDS Conference, which was held in the US for the first time since President Obama lifted a travel and [...] Read more

13
Jul2012

In this week’s Research Ethics Roundup, the 3Rs, bias in research, and compensation for research participants serve as food for thought.

What does the increase in numbers of animals used in research mean?: Statistics indicating that the use of animals in scientific research in the United Kingdom (UK) increased in 2011 were recently released. While some are concerned that this trend may indicate deviation from the 3Rs –reduction, refinement, and replacement– others believe the implications of these statistics may be more benign.

Read more