TAG ARCHIVES FOR human subjects protections

9
Mar2018

When research subjects’ capacity to consent is absent, diminished, or fluctuating, additional consent enhancements, safeguards, and support may be required by the IRB. AAHRPP Standard II-4 requires IRBs to provide additional protections for vulnerable subjects in research, including policies and procedures to protect subjects whose capacity to consent is potentially absent, diminished, or fluctuating. The regulations, however, are generally silent on the specifics of these additional protections. Read more

8
Jan2018

You are a member of the board at Florida Central IRB. You are reviewing a vaccine study for Zika2, a deadly infectious disease that has recently emerged in Florida and is spreading fast. The only clinical study discussed in the Investigator’s Brochure was conducted in Brazil, where Zika2 originated. It provides scientifically sound evidence that supports the proposed study. However, you have just learned that, because of the emergency situation in Brazil, the investigators made the decision to conduct their study without regulatory or ethics committee approval, in a vulnerable population, and without informed consent. The Brazilian manufacturer and investigators will not be involved in the proposed study. Time is of the essence. Will you vote to approve the study? Read more

26
Sep2017

Study teams and regulatory teams have different perspectives when it comes to executing research protocols, due simply to the different day-to-day responsibilities of a study team member versus a regulatory team member. While the ultimate goal of any research protocol is to generate new knowledge while protecting the rights and welfare of research subjects, sometimes study and regulatory teams differ on how to best achieve this goal. I have been fortunate enough to have worked as both a study and regulatory team member and have gained insight into how these teams differ and how they can best work together to ensure that research protocols run smoothly and achieve the highest standards of ethical research conduct. Read more

7
Jul2017

Many of us have read the Common Rule revisions around informed consent and scratched our heads. What exactly does it mean that “informed consent must begin with concise and focused…key information that is most likely to assist in understanding reasons one might or might not participate”? My hope is that key information will become the vehicle that drives greater subject understanding and gives reviewers some relief. I look forward to seeing how the guidance around and the implementation of this section develops. Read more

20
Dec2016

Research partners”—that’s what scientists and doctors call people who serve as study subjects. Government officials and ethicists use the same term, depicting subjects as equal to the professionals who conduct and oversee health research. But there’s a problem with the egalitarian language. It simply isn’t accurate. Read more