TAG ARCHIVES FOR diversity in clinical trials

19
Jan2021

Last year, Heather H. Pierce, JD, MPH and I shared some thoughts about the Belmont Report at 40, and about the evolution and flexibility of the Belmont principles of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice in the face of changing circumstances. As we leave behind the extraordinary year of 2020, I have been thinking about how the pandemic, together with the Black Lives Matter social justice movement, has shone new, and I would say welcome, light on the principle of justice in research. Read more

3
Nov2020

Amid both promising and worrying signs in the development of treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, and in the context of a considerable amount of scrutiny of medical research, some researchers, ethicists, and advocates are working to make sure science doesn’t lose sight of a critical issue: diversity in the clinical trial participant pool. The distribution of research benefits to participants—and the consideration of race in subject selection—is tightly woven into the Belmont Report and has been a mainstay in research ethics discussion ever since. But despite the decades-long consideration of race and ethnicity in clinical trials, many trials still don’t enroll populations that reflect the diversity of the general populace or the group affected by the condition being studied. Read more

11
Jun2020

When I started my research career back in 2004, I was working in the biggest trauma center in the Atlanta area, Grady Healthcare System. I had arrived in the country under a work visa to help with the Department of Orthopaedics' clinical trials. I remember the nervousness of speaking to potential study participants because I was not only new to clinical research, having only done chart review projects in the past, I was also new in America and America’s history of research with minorities. Now, after all these years working as a research coordinator and IRB professional, and living in the United States for more than 15 years, I know how important it is to rebuild trust and increase minority participation in research to ensure not only that we are doing quality studies, but also that we help in diminishing the social injustices our communities still undergo today. Read more