TAG ARCHIVES FOR AER18

16
Jul2019

Why are people taken in by pseudoscience and the accompanying “scientific” jargon that gives a false impression claims are backed by laboratory research and facts? Why have scientists like me gone from being viewed as god-like, having put mankind on the moon, to nimrods who’re in the pocket of big pharma? And most of all, how is it that I had not heard of Timothy Caulfield before the 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER18)? Read more

9
Jul2019

PRIM&R’s 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER18) was very inspiring. It provided me an opportunity to be immersed in an interesting learning opportunity, wherein I noted a common theme of this conference was to highlight the changes in the revised Common Rule and its practical implementation. Read more

25
Jun2019

Since the National Archives in Washington were founded they have solved historical mysteries, provided key information, and unlocked a great deal of forgotten knowledge. The power of records and record keeping is influential at all levels of human existence, but also may be harmful to the least empowered individuals in society (such as refugees or the elderly). At PRIM&R's AER Conference, presenters offered insights into essential documentation and stressed the importance of good record keeping and data management for IRBs. Read more

24
May2019

Approximately 80% of the US population has a social media account. Social media can be a powerful research tool for recruiting subjects and for conducting research. As regulatory professionals tasked with protecting research subjects, it’s important to understand the unique risks and benefits of social media use for research.Luckily, at PRIM&R’s 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference, there was a session devoted solely to the complex issues related to research on social media. Read more

13
May2019

For investigators, IRB members, and IRB staff alike, the revised Common Rule’s new exempt category at 45 CFR 46.104(d)(4)(iii) was a dream come true. The so-called HIPAA Exemption eliminates IRB review for research use of retrospectively or prospectively collected “identifiable health information when that use is regulated by the HIPAA Privacy Rule as health care operations, research, or for public health activities […].” Applying the HIPAA Exemption is not quite as simple as it might seem, though, as I learned at the 2018 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER18) session, appropriately titled “Just When You Thought You Understood the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.” Read more