TAG ARCHIVES FOR webinar

16
May2018

Expanded access, which is treatment access to experimental drugs (also referred to as "compassionate use" or "pre-approval access"), has generated increasing interest and debate over the last several years. Currently, US federal regulations allow manufacturers to provide Investigational New Drugs (INDs) to patients with serious diseases or conditions who have exhausted approved therapeutic options, and cannot participate in a clinical trial. As key players in the pre-approval access process, IRBs must review and approve expanded access protocols in accordance with FDA guidelines. Moreover, the new “Right to Try” laws currently taking effect on both the federal and state levels make it especially crucial that IRB members stay informed about ongoing developments and potentially thorny ethical issues. Read more

26
Apr2018

The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the Animal Welfare Act Regulations describe rules and best practices for animal care and use professionals to follow in order to ensure high welfare standards are upheld for animals used in research. When an IACUC finds something that diverges from these regulations and standards, it can be a challenge to know whether and where to report the issue. To complicate matters, OLAW and USDA APHIS use differing terminology to describe these occurrences, and have different requirements for reporting. A solid, systematic framework for understanding, sorting, and managing “exceptions” and “departures” can help IACUC administrators more effectively sort through complex issues of compliance. Read more

26
Mar2018

Research conducted in international settings poses particular challenges for the reviewing IRB, as it must possess adequate knowledge of laws and regulations in the country where the research is taking place, and be sensitive to the area’s cultural norms, in order to appropriately evaluate the study. Social, behavioral, and educational research (SBER) in particular may involve the study of stigmatized health conditions or behaviors, and may require the recruitment of marginalized populations and minors. Conducting research on these topics is important, but it is equally essential that IRBs and researchers mitigate the risk of social consequences that might result from subjects’ participation in the study, such as rejection in their communities or conflict within their families. The regulations regarding human subjects protections vary greatly between countries as well, which can lead to additional difficulties for IRBs. Read more

9
Mar2018

When research subjects’ capacity to consent is absent, diminished, or fluctuating, additional consent enhancements, safeguards, and support may be required by the IRB. AAHRPP Standard II-4 requires IRBs to provide additional protections for vulnerable subjects in research, including policies and procedures to protect subjects whose capacity to consent is potentially absent, diminished, or fluctuating. The regulations, however, are generally silent on the specifics of these additional protections. Read more

15
Feb2018

Suicide is an urgent and growing public health crisis. It was the tenth leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with over 44,000 deaths, according to the CDC. Studying suicide, and including suicidal or potentially suicidal individuals in clinical research, is an important way to gain valuable data that can advance prevention efforts. Researchers and IRBs may tend to exclude suicidal individuals from research in order to avoid potential risks; however, in order for the research to be scientifically and clinically valuable, it is important that suicidal individuals are not excluded from research unnecessarily. Read more

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