TAG ARCHIVES FOR informed consent

20
Dec2016

Research partners”—that’s what scientists and doctors call people who serve as study subjects. Government officials and ethicists use the same term, depicting subjects as equal to the professionals who conduct and oversee health research. But there’s a problem with the egalitarian language. It simply isn’t accurate. Read more

20
Jan2016

This session at the 2015 Advancing Ethical Research (AER) Conference was a follow up to the 2014 AER Conference session "Using Empirical Evidence to Reduce Consent Form Length" presented by Amy Corneli, PhD, MPH, and Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH, MA. In last year’s talk, they shared preliminary data about their effective delivery of informed consent (EDICT) study based on interviews questioning what participants thought must be in the informed consent form (ICF) and what could be removed. This year’s follow-up session by Amy Corneli shared the study findings submitted for publication. What was learned can be put to use by [...] Read more

24
Nov2015

On September 8, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for revisions to the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects , or "Common Rule." If adopted, the proposals in the NPRM will result in the most substantive revisions to the core regulation governing federally funded human subjects research in the United States since 1981.

In earlier posts, we explored a new category of activities that would be excluded from oversight under the Common Rule and proposed changes to the category of Read more

22
Sep2015

The much-anticipated Notice of Proposed Rulemaking—offering the first changes to the Common Rule since its publication in 1991—has now been released. in the interest of providing PRIM&R’s community with as much exposure to the issues raised within it, and the writing and scholarship around the proposed rules changes, PRIM&R and other organizations are cross-posting their thoughts.  This post, from Dr. Celia B. Fisher at Fordham University, focuses on the proposed changes to minimal risk.  It originally appeared on Ethics & Society, the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education blog.

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11
Sep2015

In the wake of the controversy over the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT), a team of bioethicists set out to answer two main questions raised by the controversy: (1) “what do people think about the risks and benefits of research on medical practices?,” and (2) “what do people think about different approaches to informing patients that this type of research is being conducted?” Their research, the Research on Medical Practices Ethics Study, examined the views of the general population regarding research on medical practices through a series [...] Read more

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