I recently attended a lecture titled, “Your Parameter is My Process,” in which a former professor of mine recounted her experience working on interdisciplinary research teams. She had noticed that questions she spent years investigating as a hydrologist were, in contrast, boiled down to simple equations or variables in an ecologist’s study—and vice versa. The takeaway was that based on a person’s background, training, education, and experience, they approach a problem differently. Read more


Before attending AER16, I was warned that it can be a bit overwhelming. Between the choices in sessions, the panels, the keynote speakers, and information provided , there is such a wealth of information it can be difficult to process it all. Since the Ethical Research Board (ERB) at Nashua Community College (which I chair) is quite new, the list of tasks we have to create, consider, and complete already feels endless; moreover, picking a starting place is difficult, given that everything seems essential. Two of my sessions on the second day of the conference, helped me refocus my ‘to do’ list— and provided me the title for this blog post. Read more


This week’s Research Ethics Roundup examines new findings on who benefits from genome-wide association studies, India’s new informed consent provisions, the European Union’s new clinical study report policy, and British researchers’ arguments for non-human primate research. Read more

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