TAG ARCHIVES FOR AER16

11
Aug2017

PRIM&R invites members of our conference Blog Squads to reflect on the conference they attended in an additional post six months after the event. In this post, AER16 Blog Squad member Seth Hall reflects on how he's applied what he learned at AER16 to his day-to-day work. Read more

10
May2017

Poster presenters at our annual conferences often continue their research or program long after the event. Read on for more from Deirdre Lombardi, MPH, CPH, CHES, Challace Pahlevan-Ibrekic, CIP, MS, Brenda Ruotolo, BA, CIP, and Alan Teller, CIP, who presented a poster titled Development of a Specialized IRB for Genetics and Genomics Research, at the 2016 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER16). Read more

2
May2017

Because of the intensity of my institution’s human research program, I always have to strike a balance, upon returning from a PRIM&R Advancing Ethical Research conference, between wanting to immediately focus on incorporating what I’ve learned—policy revisions, procedural changes, and staff/member training ideas—and having to jump instead into the usual fray of trying to keep up with “normal” responsibilities. As with so many things in life, compromise and balance come into play. Read more

21
Mar2017

One of my goals for attending the 2016 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER16) was to figure out a plan for how to address a growing need on my campus. Each year, we have more students interested in research. This means the Ethical Research Board (ERB) at my institution needs a clear path to support the faculty in the design and incorporation of research into their coursework and a way to educate students on how to create and conduct an ethical research project, all without overwhelming its members. The majority of our projects are social, behavioral, and educational research (SBER), and most are minimal risk, but as I mentioned in a previous post we are a new board, still working on our procedures and policies. I waited to discuss this goal in my wrap-up post intentionally – my questions were not necessarily addressed in a single session, but rather over the course of the the four days, through a series of sessions, networking luncheons, conversations, and panels. Read more

1
Mar2017

It’s hard to grasp how little you know. Having worked as an IRB administrator at a research hospital for a little over a year, I think I’ve come far in understanding ethical review of medical research. The learning curve is steep, but my study of the regulations and supporting materials, as well as help from the professionals I work with, provided me with a base of knowledge about ethical research. I applied what I learned in my day-to-day work, and when unique events arose, I went back to source material or relied on my colleagues to find to a solution. Read more

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